Tag Archives: body

Joint mobilising series

This collection of movements is a multi-purpose series designed to:

  • warm up some of the major muscles of the body
  • warm up some of the major joints of the body
  • develop your physical awareness of some of the major muscles and joints in your body
  • help transition from the stresses and strains of the day towards a calming Yoga practice

It is also a very useful sequence to do if you are confined to bed, or the sofa, but are feeling achy and in need of doing something.

1. Shoulder mobilising sequence from this post

2. Leg stretch

Have your knees bent and feet on the floor/bed. Draw your right knee in towards your belly and hold the back of your right thigh with both hands. As you breathe in (inhale) straighten your leg as much as you can and as you breathe out (exhale) bend your knee back to the starting position.

Draw your left knee in towards your belly and hold the back of your  left thigh  with both hands. As you breathe in (inhale) straighten your leg as much as you can and as you breathe out (exhale) bend your knee back to the starting position.

Recommendation: repeat up to five times, building up to ten times.

Extension 1: Extend your leg, and hold the stretch for up to 10 breaths.

Extension 2: repeat the movement using both legs

Extension 3:extend both legs and hold the stretch for up to 10 breaths

3. Ankle twirls

Have your knees bent and feet on the floor/bed. Draw your right knee in towards your belly and hold the back of your right thigh with both hands. As you breathe in (inhale) straighten your leg as much as you can. Twirl your ankle around one way and then twirl your ankle around in the opposite direction. As you breathe out (exhale) bend your knee back to the starting position.

Have your knees bent and feet on the floor/bed. Draw your left knee in towards your belly and hold the back of your left thigh with both hands. As you breathe in (inhale) straighten your leg as much as you can. Twirl your ankle around one way and then twirl your ankle around in the opposite direction. As you breathe out (exhale) bend your knee back to the starting position.

Recommendation: repeat up to five times, building up to ten times.

4. Hip openers

Gently rest both hands on your right knee and move your knee in a circle by pulling it towards you. opening to the side, pushing it away from you and then taking your knee over your left hip.

Repeat with your left knee.

Recommendation: repeat up to five times, building up to ten times.

5. Reclining cobblers pose

Start with knees bent and feet on the bed / floor. when you are ready, drop your left knee out to the left side, and then drop your right knee out to the right.. Bring your soles together. If you want to you can place cushions underneath your thighs to help support your legs. You may wish to put your hands on your thighs to help increase the stretch. Just do what feels right.

Recommendation: hold for between 5 and 10 breaths.

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3 gentle moves to alleviate discomfort from being in bed – mobilising your shoulders

This series of movements focusses on the shoulders. These movements can be done lying in bed or sitting up. See which position your prefer by trying them both. If you decide to practice these lying down in bed, scoot down the bed a little and make sure you have plenty of space above your head – you’ll need to freely be able to move your arms above your head.

 

Make sure your read the guidelines first.

1. Shoulder mobilising A

Start in the lying on your back, knees bent position with your arms by the side of your body, palms down. This is your neutral position.

a) Slowly bring your right arm up over your head as you breathe in.

b) As you breathe out, return your arm back to the neutral position.

c) Slowly bring your left arm up over your head as you breathe in.

d) As you breathe out, return your arm back to the neutral position.

Recommendation – repeat five times, building up to ten times on each side.

2. Shoulder mobilising B

Start in the lying on your back, knees bent position with your arms by the side of your body, palms down. This is your neutral position.

a) Slowly bring your both arms up over your head as you breathe in.

b) As you breathe out, return both arms back to the neutral position.

Recommendation – repeat five times, building up to ten times on each side.

3. Shoulder mobilising C

Start in the lying on your back, knees bent position with your arms by the side of your body, palms down. This is your neutral position.

a) Bring your right hand across to your left shoulder and try to pull your arm across as far as you can, feeling a stretch at the upper back.

b) Release and return to neutral

c) Bring your left hand across to your right shoulder and try to pull your arm across as far as you can, feeling a stretch at the upper back.

b) Release and return to neutral

Recommendation – repeat five times, building up to ten times on each side.

Round off the routine by stretching both hands up over your head and having a good stretch.

3 gentle moves to alleviate discomfort from being in bed – mobilising your neck

This series of movements is all about mobilising your neck muscles. These movements can be done lying in bed or sitting up. See which position your prefer by trying them both.If you decide to practice these lying down in bed, scoot down the bed a little and make sure you have plenty of space above your head. Remember to read the guidelines first!

1. Mobilising your neck A

Start by tucking your chin into your neck and then:

a) Roll your head towards your right shoulder

b) Roll your head back to centre

c) Roll your head towards your left shoulder

d) Roll your head back to centre

Recommendation: Repeat between 5 and 10 times to each side.

2. Mobilising your neck B

Start in a neutral position and then:

a) Drop your head to your left, as if you are trying to bring your left ear towards your left shoulder

b) Keeping your chin tucked in, roll your head to centre and then towards the right, finishing with your right ear towards your right shoulder

c) Keeping your chin tucked in, roll your head to centre and then towards the left, finishing with your left ear towards your left shoulder.

Recommendation: Repeat between 5 and 10 times to each side.

3. Mobilising your neck C

Start in a neutral position and then:

a) Keeping your chin level, turn your head to the left

b) Return to neutral

c) Keeping your chin level, turn your head to the right

d) Return to neutral

Recommendation: Repeat between 5 and 10 times to each side.

3 gentle moves to alleviate discomfort from being in bed – lower body

Sooner or later after surgery, the novelty of a morphine pump will wear off, and horror (@.@) you realise that the nursing staff will actually take it away from you so you will have to retire from your career as an opium eater. You aren’t quite ready to get out of bed let alone go for a walk, but you are starting to want to move about a bit. As you are weaned off pain relief, aches and pains related to being immobile and in bed will present themselves to you.

This sequence of movements is aimed at mobilising the lower body and back, and you should be able to do them whilst in bed.

This series of movements is fantastic to do at any time, at any point. I use them all the time as warm up or cool down before my Yoga practice and also if I have back ache, it’s an excellent first aid treatment for getting rid of aches and pains.

Check out the guidelines first!

1. Pelvic tilt

In addition to helping you to engage with your abdominal muscles, this practice has the added benefit of stretching your lower back as well as activating your abdominal muscles.

a) Start by lying on your back and if possible come to a position where your knees are bent and your feet are on the floor or the bed. Put your hands on your hips and begin by pressing the back of your waist into the bed. When you first start doing this, this might be as much as you can do, and that is absolutely fine.

b) To move on, as you press the back of your waist into the bed, try to draw your navel in towards your spine.

c) For the third stage try to tilt your pelvis towards you as your press the back of your waist into the bed.

d) Finally you press down through your feet in order to lift your hips slightly off the bed.

Recommendation – start with 5 repetitions and gradually build up to 30 repetitions

2. Hug knees to belly

This is a movement which complements the pelvic tilt very well. This stretches out the back of the body and can be very helpful in starting to restore your mobility. The action of bringing your knees up on to your belly helps you to get to know your insides again after your surgery.

a) Begin with your knees bent and feet on the floor / your bed. If you can, use your hands to draw your right knee towards your belly and hold this position for a few breaths and then release.

b) Keeping your knees bent and feet on the floor / your bed. If you can, use your hands to draw your left knee towards your belly and hold this position for a few breaths and then release. notice if this side feels different to the first side.

c) If you want to you could repeat this movement on each side, but this time pull your knee in closer to your belly. You should feel a stretch in your lower back and the back of your hips along with gentle pressure on your abdomen.

d) Once you have become familiar with the movement on each side, try bringing both knees on to your belly, one at a time. Hold for a few breaths and then release.

e) If you want to you could repeat this movement with both knees on your belly, but this time pull your knees in closer to your belly. You should feel a stretch in your lower back and the back of your hips along with gentle pressure on your abdomen.

Recommendation – start with 5 repetitions and gradually build up to 30 repetitions

3. Supine Twist

a) Come to knees bent and feet on the bed or the floor, if you are doing this on the floor. Have your knees and feet together. Use your folded towel and both hands to apply gently pressure on your abdomen. Very gently drop your left knee to the left until it is resting on the bed / floor. If your knee won’t go that far, then use a pillow to support the knee at whatever height is comfortable for you. Then drop your right knee to the left knee so that the right knee and ankle are resting on the left knee and ankle.

b) Rest here for a few breaths feeling the stretch along the right side of your body.

c) Come back to the starting position. Have your knees and feet together. Use your folded towel and both hands to apply gently pressure on your abdomen. Very gently drop your right knee to the right until it is resting on the bed / floor. If your knee won’t go that far, then use a pillow to support the knee at whatever height is comfortable for you. Then drop your left knee to the right knee so that the left knee and ankle are resting on the right knee and ankle.

d) Rest here for a few breaths feeling the stretch along the left side of your body.

Recommendation – start with 5 repetitions and gradually build up to 30 repetitions

Finish the sequence with a couple of repetitions or the pelvic tilt or the knees to chest.

Dealing with body odours at work and home

Unfortunately there are several chronic diseases which cause body odour which can range from being weird and unexpected (sweet smell associated with diabetes) through to being pungent or offensive (e.g. Trimethylaminuria).

Here are some thoughts from me about how you can deal with such awkward aromas:

  1. Check with your GP whether you should be avoiding any particular foods which might be contributing to the smell (e.g. Choline and Trimethylaminuria)
  2. Do a ‘reality check’ – ask some trusted friends or family members about your odour / perceived odour. You want an honest appraisal, so choose people who will give you real answer rather than polite answer. It is a good idea to do this at the end of an ordinary work day. Find out what the impact of odour is with your different work layers on and from different distances e.g. standing in a lift, sitting around a board room table or chatting one to one.
  3. Talk to your GP about trying a probiotic supplement to help support your digestion.
  4. Try a chlorophyll supplement such as body mint which seems to magically reduce many body odours.
  5. Make sure your clothes aren’t contributing to the problem by cleaning and drying them properly, especially if they are stained with bodily fluids such as sweat or urine. Also check coats and jackets for smells and make sure they are regularly  dry-cleaned. Make sure your washing machine is clean as a dirty washing machine can impart a musty smell onto otherwise clean clothes.
  6. Keep your breath smelling sweet by cleaning your teeth regularly, using an antibacterial mouthwash and addressing any mouth symptoms such as ulcers with your GP.
  7. Ensure good personal hygiene by bathing frequently, using antiperspirant deodorant and other products that are appropriate. ‘Reality check’ different products with friends and family for effectiveness and pleasantness. Your workplace will have different rules / norms for perfume and scented products so make sure what you wear fits in well.

How do you manage the malodorous?