Category Archives: Comforts

Recipe #2 Lush Hypoallergenic Mega Easy Banana Ice Cream Recipe

Well the title says it all really. This is a super lush, hypoallergenic mega easy banana ice cream recipe. Unless you are allergic to bananas or frozen things, in which case – don’t eat this. 

 

You will need:

  • A bunch of bananas
  • A freezer
  • A freezer proof container or food bag
  • A sharp knife
  • A container
  • A food processor

Peel and slice bananas into 2 cm chunks. Put sliced bananas loosely into a freezerproof container and freeze. Don’t pack the bananas too tightly as the aim is that you can seperate out the slices once frozen.

Once frozen (takes about 24 hours) set up your food processor so you have it on the blades / liquidising setting. Fill the bowl up with the seperated chunks of frozen banana. If you more than half fill the bowl, divide the chunks into two batches.

Ok, steel your nerves, and switch the food processor on.

It will start by just chopping up the banana in a ‘this will never work’ way, but then miraculously, you will start to see a creamy ice cream form. Once all the banana chunk have turned into ice cream, turn it out into a feezer proof bowl and re-freeze. By all means sneak a little tester bowl at this stage!

Eat and enjoy!

This was absolutely gorgeous and we had a discussion about how we could pimp it up with toppings, here are some ideas:

  • maple syrup
  • fresh cherries
  • nuts (not for crohnies)
  • Honey
  • Rum!

I tried using a jug style liquidiser to puree the banana and it just didn’t work – the first cm was pulverised but nothing else would sink down onto the blades.  If you only have a jug style liquidiser, then puree the bananas first before freezing. If you don’t have a liquidiser, then use a potato masher, and if you don’t have one of those, mash the bananas with a fork – you won’t get the same creamy consistency though.

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20 Ways to relax when you are in pain

It is hard to relax when you are in pain. Crohn’s Disease isn’t content with just one type of pain, it has an entire reportoire of sensations to delight you with… Although there are painkillers available, both prescription and over-the-counter, these come with other effects in addition to painkilling such as constipation, nausea, dizziness and drowsiness. This means that sometimes people with Crohn’s prefer not to take the painkillers, but still want to relax. As some of you know I am a Yoga Teacher and so effective relaxation is something I am very interested in.

There are three types of realxation: Physical, emotional / spiritual and mental relaxation.

Physical relaxation includes things like massages, baths and naps.

Emotional / spiritual relaxation includes things such as informal social support from friends

Mental relaxation – includes activities and techniques that can help alleviate mental stress such as meditation

  1. Have a laugh – laughter is a great way to relieve stress. It doesn’t have to be hours of belly laughs, but having a session with things that you find hilarious  can help lift your mood, relax you and hopefully decrease the pain you are in. When you have the chance, have a think about what really tickles you and maybe make a note of it. (For me it would include Michael Mcintyre’s ‘Man Drawer‘ sketch; Monty Python’s Holy Grail and Life of Brian  and
  2. Go Swimming
  3. Take a Warm bath
  4. Have a relaxing massage
  5. Put your feet up with a good book
  6. Relax in bed with a hot water bottle and a movie
  7. Go for a walk and get some fresh air
  8. A nice cup of tea / coffee / hot chocolate and a short break
  9. Have a beauty treatment such as a facial or a pedicure
  10. Watch feel good or funny movies
  11. Carry out some breathing exercises
  12. Take some exercise
  13. Listen to music or an audio book
  14. Follow progressive neuromuscular release techniques
  15. Consciously relax your neck, jaw etc
  16. Spend time with family and friends
  17. Do something speical or thoughtful for someone else
  18. Devise, shop for and prepare a special meal
  19. Art

Please help card in French for people with IBD

Travelling abroad with an IBD, indeed any health problem, has a few additional complications on top of the standard hassle of not forgetting anything important, leaving on time and not losing your bank cards.

To help ease some of the stress I’ve developed a variation of the NACC’s ‘Can’t wait card’ for you to use when travelling abroad.  This card will help you communicate when you need to use public toilet facilities but don’t know where they are. If there are no public facilities nearby then the card also asks if  you can use private / staff facilities. The second side of the card is for those occasions when there is a public toilet, but you need to pay to use it – and you don’t have the right change.

Although many people speak English across the world, and there are phrase books that help you, my experience is that rushing to try to find a toilet is stressful and difficult to communicate. You are often misunderstood. These useful phrases often don’t appear in phrase books. In some rural areas the majority of people don’t speak English.

Please help card in French

I have had the following text translated into French and put it into a Credit card sized pdf that you can print out and laminate. You can keep it in your wallet/pocket for emergencies.

This is free to download but if you can afford to it would be great if you could donate to a charity which supports Crohn’s and Colitis .e.g. through my Just giving page.  If you can’t print this out and laminate it yourself please contact me as I can do this for you. I will charge a fee for materials, postage and a donation.

What the card says

SIDE 1:

Culturally appropriate greeting

Please help!

I have a medical condition which means I need to use the toilet urgently.

This condition is not infectious or hazardous to other people.

Please can you show me where the nearest toilets are that I can use?

If there are no public toilets nearby, may I use your staff facilities?

Culturally appropriate way of expressing thanks

SIDE 2.

Culturally appropriate greeting

Please help!

I have a medical condition which means I need to use the toilet urgently.

This condition is not infectious or dangerous to other people.

I do not have the entrance fee required to use these toilets, and because of the pain I am in I do not have time to get the correct change.

Please will you let me use these toilets? I will come back and pay afterwards.

Culturally appropriate way of expressing thanks

Directions

  1. Please make a donation to Crohns and Colitis UK through my ‘Just Giving’ page
  2. Print out the Please help card in French
  3. Cut out the two card shapes below
  4. Glue them together, so the text is showing on the outside
  5. Place in a laminating sleeve
  6. Laminate!
  7. Alternatively you could make two cards by not gluing them together and laminating them separately.

Acknowledgements

Grateful thanks to Irma Elizabeth, languages teacher, for her translation of the text into French for this card.

An if you have missed the embedded links here they are:

Just giving donation page for Crohn’s and Colitis UK

Please help card in French

Over the next couple of days I will be uploading a Frenchnew language versions of the card. Do you speak another language? Can you help this project? Contact me if you can!

Please help card in German for people with IBD

Travelling abroad with an IBD, indeed any health problem, has a few additional complications on top of the standard hassle of not forgetting anything important, leaving on time and not losing your bank cards.

To help ease some of the stress I’ve developed a variation of the NACC’s ‘Can’t wait card’ for you to use when travelling abroad.  This card will help you communicate when you need to use public toilet facilities but don’t know where they are. If there are no public facilities nearby then the card also asks if  you can use private / staff facilities. The second side of the card is for those occasions when there is a public toilet, but you need to pay to use it – and you don’t have the right change.

Although many people speak English across the world, and there are phrase books that help you, my experience is that rushing to try to find a toilet is stressful and difficult to communicate. You are often misunderstood. These useful phrases often don’t appear in phrase books. In some rural areas the majority of people don’t speak English.

Please help card in German

I have had the following text translated into German and put it into a Credit card sized pdf that you can print out and laminate. You can keep it in your wallet/pocket for emergencies.

This is free to download but if you can afford to it would be great if you could donate to a charity which supports Crohn’s and Colitis .e.g. through my Just giving page.  If you can’t print this out and laminate it yourself please contact me as I can do this for you. I will charge a fee for materials, postage and a donation.

What the card says

SIDE 1:

Culturally appropriate greeting

Please help!

I have a medical condition which means I need to use the toilet urgently.

This condition is not infectious or hazardous to other people.

Please can you show me where the nearest toilets are that I can use?

If there are no public toilets nearby, may I use your staff facilities?

Culturally appropriate way of expressing thanks

SIDE 2.

Culturally appropriate greeting

Please help!

I have a medical condition which means I need to use the toilet urgently.

This condition is not infectious or dangerous to other people.

I do not have the entrance fee required to use these toilets, and because of the pain I am in I do not have time to get the correct change.

Please will you let me use these toilets? I will come back and pay afterwards.

Culturally appropriate way of expressing thanks

Directions

  1. Please make a donation to Crohns and Colitis UK through my ‘Just Giving’ page
  2. Print out the Please help card in German
  3. Cut out the two card shapes below
  4. Glue them together, so the text is showing on the outside
  5. Place in a laminating sleeve
  6. Laminate!
  7. Alternatively you could make two cards by not gluing them together and laminating them separately.

Acknowledgements

Grateful thanks to Pauline Kussell, student from Germany currently residing with my friend Carla in Shrewsbury, for her translation of the text into German for this card.

An if you have missed the embedded links here they are:

Just giving donation page for Crohn’s and Colitis UK

Please help card in German

Over the next couple of days I will be uploading a French version of the card. Do you speak another language? Can you help this project? Contact me if you can!

My top five books for when I am ill #1

When having a flare up or a hospital stay, there comes a point when you are ill where you transition from complete incapacity to incapacity and boredom. Wooziness from painkillers and IV antibiotics makes concentration difficult, as does general life on the ward with it’s interruptions and strange sleep patterns.

Reading is a great way to pass this time, but anything too complicated makes my head spin.

Maybe you are looking for something to put in your hosital bag, or a gift for someone stuck on a ward somewhere. Here are my top 5 books for this period of time, and they work equally well for convalescing at home too:

1. Anything by James Herroit but I particularly like ‘all creatures great and small’ and ‘It shouldn’t happen to a vet’.

2. Anything by P G Wodehouse but in particular the ‘Carry on Jeeves’ from the Jeeves and Wooster series.

3. Anything by Agatha Christie but in particular The mirror crack’d from side to side and Murder on the Orient Express

4. Elizabeth David’s collection of articles ‘An Omlette and a glass of wine’

5. Driving over lemons

What are your top five books for the twilight zone between complete incapcity and incapacity and boredom?